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© 2019 by LB PCN

REGIONAL

2018

MALAKAS AT MAGANDA

    The origin is Leyte. Malakas means “The Strong” and Maganda means “The Beautiful.” They are the parents of all the people of the island. There is also a birder that perches on a huge bamboo stick because it heard weird noises from it. It pecked on it until the Malakas and Maganda came out.

KINUGSIK KUGSIK

    The Manobo tribe once lived harmoniously with squirrels. They named these squirrels "kugsik" and created a dance to imitate these cuddly and friendly creatures. Now an endangered species, the Manobo tribe continues to dance the kinugsik kugsik to remember the once thriving squirrel community of the rexgion. This dance reenacts a love triangle between two male kugsik and a female kugsik as they scamper about the forest

KADAL TAHAW

2017

    This dance is performed by the T'boli during planting and harvesting which shows the flights and hops of the tahaw bird.

PAGDIWATA

Originating from the Tagbanua tribe, this dance is a festival of thanksgiving to the Gods for their blessings and healing powers. This ritual celebrates three goddesses that heal the sick and give the people a bountiful harvest and hunting expedition.

BINAYLAN BANOG
LAWIN LAWIN

This celebratory dance is a rite-of-passage of the males in the Bagobo tribe as they mimic the movements of an eagle (Lawin). The dance portrays the maturation of an eagle--from an egg to a strong adult. Long shields are used to represent an eagle’s wings soaring through the open sky.

Originating from the Tagbanua tribe, this dance is a festival of thanksgiving to the Gods for their blessings and healing powers. This ritual celebrates three goddesses that heal the sick and give the people a bountiful harvest and hunting expedition.